Lioness makes a intercourse toy that’s akin to the Fitbit of vibrators, and it’s utilizing the information from its biofeedback sensor to visualise feminine orgasms as artistic endeavors.

The Artgasm is a form of music visualizer that turns information from feminine orgasms into pulsating artwork animations, and it will likely be on show publicly for the primary time at CES 2018, the large tech commerce present in Las Vegas subsequent week. Each visualization charts information from an nameless particular person’s actual orgasm. It’s all a part of the corporate’s quest to turn out to be a pacesetter in sexual well being and to teach girls and couples about their very own sexuality by data-centric, goal evaluation.

Liz Klinger, cofounder and CEO of the corporate, mentioned Lioness is a female-led firm that was began by a bunch of grads on the University of California at Berkeley. The firm raised $1.4 million from Creative Ventures and early stage angels, and it debuted the Lioness Vibrator in August 2017. The firm shipped greater than 1,000 of its preordered items, and it’s gearing up for additional manufacturing.

Above: The Lioness Vibrator captures information on orgasms.

Image Credit: Lioness

The Artgasm will probably be on show at varied venues, and beginning this spring Lioness will share it with customers through its app.

Klinger mentioned that the Lioness Vibrator relies on many years of analysis and is supported by medical doctors, therapists, and sexual analysis consultants alike. Lioness’ work has obtained world protection from the New York Times, Mashable, Daily Mail, and lots of others. Klinger gave a TEDx discuss on the subject of higher intercourse.

Through Artgasm, Lioness goals to provide girls one other option to view, perceive, and admire their distinctive our bodies and experiences.

“Before founding Lioness, I was an artist and did work associated to gender and sexuality,” Klinger mentioned in an e mail. “I made life casts (sculptures) of the feminine body. Many fashions I labored with voiced insecurities about their our bodies sooner or later through the course of — one boob seems to be droopy, one thing seems to be too massive, too small. Something was all the time too this or that.”

She added, “But for a lot of girls, their insecurities melted away once they noticed the completed product. By displaying them their our bodies by a brand new perspective, they have been capable of see their our bodies as they have been: artistic endeavors. It’s these type of experiences and self-reflection we’re now bringing to 1000’s of ladies with the Lioness Vibrator.”

Above: Left to proper: Anna Lee, Liz Klinger, and James Wang of Lioness.

Image Credit: Lioness

Klinger began her profession as an artist, and her work has been featured in settings starting from magazines to northern New Hampshire galleries to Lower Manhattan pubs. Cofounder Anna Lee was beforehand a mechanical design engineer on the Amazon Lab126’s Concept Engineering crew that launched the Kindle Voyage and Amazon Dash button. And cofounder James Wang is an information and AI skilled who beforehand labored at Bridgewater, the world’s largest hedge fund, and at Google X on the Makani crew.

Together, they constructed a vibrator with biofeedback sensors that sense power, motion, and temperature. From that, they’ll accumulate information on pelvic flooring contractions and total sexual response, which varies extensively from individual to individual.

“Our customers to date have used Lioness to discover their very own expertise of enjoyment, attempt new issues, and handle questions they’ve had behind their minds however haven’t had an opportunity to ask or discover in different methods,” Klinger mentioned.

The Artgasm captures a visible illustration of a person’s physiological reactions throughout arousal and orgasm. By utilizing the information collected from the person’s session, the crew has created artwork that “depicts the orgasm sample in a enjoyable and wild method,” Klinger mentioned.

The firm has seven staff.

This article sources data from VentureBeat